REU

REU Program
I’m McKensie Daugherty, your host for On the Ocean.Texas A&M University has a new Research Experience for Undergraduates program (or, R E U) focusing on Observing the Ocean that will be led by faculty in the Department of Oceanography and the Geochemical and Environmental Research Group. REU programs are funded by the National Science Foundation to provide active research opportunities for undergraduate students. An REU Site consists of a group of ten or so undergraduates who work in the research programs of the host institution. Each student is associated with a specific research project, where he or she works closely with the faculty and other researchers. Students are granted stipends and, in many cases, assistance with housing and travel. Students in Texas A&M’s “Observing the Ocean” REU program will learn about the  tools used for ocean observing, such as autonomous underwater gliders, wave gliders, imaging systems, remote sensing, and analytical analyses. And, more importantly, they will learn how to use the data from ocean observatories, buoys, time series and sea-going studies to investigate oceanographic questions.  They will work with faculty who study issues facing the coastal ocean, such as hypoxia, harmful algae, oil spills and ocean acidification, to conduct individual research projects and to acquire analytical skills. Communication is also an important part of research, so students will give frequent updates on their projects, and will compete for a travel award to allow the student to present his or her research at a national conference. Undergraduate students, particularly those majoring in physics, chemistry, computer science, and engineering, are encouraged to check out the details on the Department of Oceanography’s REU site at ocean.tamu.edu/academics/reu/ and join us for an exciting summer. This has been On the Ocean, a program made possible by the Department of Oceanography and a production of KAMU-FM on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station. For more information and links, please go to ocean.tamu.edu and click On the Ocean.
REU information:
Texas A&M Oceanography scientist, students and crew of the R/V Trident at the boat basin at Texas A&M Galveston located on Pelican Island on June 26, 2015.  The mission of the day was to launch two gliders intot the Gulf of Mexico to study the oxygen levels of the dead zone.
Texas A&M Oceanography scientist, students and crew of the R/V Trident at the boat basin at Texas A&M Galveston located on Pelican Island on June 26, 2015. The mission of the day was to launch two gliders intot the Gulf of Mexico to study the oxygen levels of the dead zone.

Hurricanes 4 -How to study a Hurricane

I’m McKensie Daugherty, your host for On the Ocean. Hurricanes are incredibly destructive, and need warm ocean temperatures to form. In the wake of a warming world due to global climate change, researchers are determined to better understand hurricanes now and in the future. To do this, scientists use satellites to track and study conditions of the ocean and the climate surrounding it. For example, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites are a set of weather satellites that generate images of the earth every 30 minutes using Visible, Infrared, or Water Vapor images to track weather conditions around the world. By using these satellites, scientists are able to study what conditions can create and affect hurricanes, and use this data for tracking and forecasting of these gigantic storms. NASA also has research aircrafts (manned and unmanned) that are flown into and above the hurricanes to gather data such as wind speed and rain. In fact, a group known as the “Hurricane Hunters” made up of National Oceanographic Atmospheric Administration, United States Navy, Air Force, Air Force Reserve, and units fly into these storms to gather information satellites cannot provide, such as barometric pressures and more accurate wind speed measurements. All data of this nature are necessary to get the most reliable forecast for hurricane development and movement. Another avenue of research is using computers to model hurricanes, a process that constructs predictions on storm paths and intensities to help the public prepare for these storms in a time-sensitive matter. Models use a lot of data, including collections from satellites, buoys, tide gauges, aircrafts, and Doppler radar. By working together with ocean observing teams from universities and government centers, scientists can help improve the storm preparation and evacuation process, which helps save lives. This has been On the Ocean, a program made possible by the Department of Oceanography and a production of KAMU-FM on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station. For more information and links, please go to ocean.tamu.edu and click On the Ocean.

More Information and Links:

Contributing Professor: Dr. Courtney Schumacher

http://atmo.tamu.edu/people/faculty/schumachercourtney.html

ResearcherID

Links:

Information/Preparing for Hurricanes:

Ready.gov-Hurricanes

National Hurricane Center

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare/

REALLY cool satellite images:

http://www.goes.noaa.gov/

http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/GOES/

Hurricanes 3 -What’s in a name?

I’m McKensie Daugherty, your host for On the Ocean. This week we will take a look at the names and classifications of hurricanes, and what they mean to the people in their paths. To begin, hurricanes are a type of tropical cyclone. In fact, it depends on where the storms are formed as to what they are called locally. The word hurricane is for the Atlantic ocean, the Caribbean sea, and the central and northeast Pacific ocean. Typhoons are formed in the northwest Pacific, and in the South Pacific and Indian oceans, they are called cyclones. No matter the term they all mean the same thing: a very dangerous tropical cyclone. But what, in fact, is the degree of danger for each hurricane? This is where the Saffir-Simpson scale is used. Each hurricane is identified as one of 5 categories, with each category representing a degree of wind speed. Category one is windspeed of above 74 miles an hour and is classified as very dangerous winds, with the threat of power outages for days. Category 2 is above 96 miles per hour winds and is classified as extremely dangerous winds, with power outages for possibly many days. Category 3 is classified as above 111 mile an hour winds and devastating damage that can cause power outages for up to several weeks. Category 4 is classified as winds above 130 miles an hour and listed as catastrophic damage occurring, including power outages expected for many weeks. Finally, category 5 is listed as above 157 mile an hour winds, with catastrophic damage including power losses for weeks to months, and can cause the area to be uninhabitable. However, even a category 1 hurricane is meant for evacuation, as all categories have the potential to be deadly. Storms are named if they reach tropical storm strength, and go in alphabetical order. The names are chosen from one of 6 existing lists, with one list being used each year. This has been On the Ocean, a program made possible by the Department of Oceanography and a production of KAMU-FM on the campus of Texas A&M University in College Station. For more information and links, please go to ocean.tamu.edu and click On the Ocean.

 

More Information and Links:

Contributing Professor: Dr. Courtney Schumacher

http://atmo.tamu.edu/people/faculty/schumachercourtney.html

ResearcherID

Links:

Information/Preparing for Hurricanes:

Ready.gov-Hurricanes

National Hurricane Center

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/prepare/

REALLY cool satellite images:

http://www.goes.noaa.gov/

http://weather.msfc.nasa.gov/GOES/